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20120928
20121006
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, that's what we did. [applause] the new health care law helps make sure you don't have to worry about going broke just because you or a loved one gets sick. insurance companies can no longer put lifetime limits on your care. or jack up your premiums without reason. or drop your coverage when you need it most. they can no longer discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions. and soon they will no longer be able to deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions like breast cancer or charge you more for the same care just because you're a woman. this law has already allowed nearly seven million young adults under the age of 26 to sign up and stay on their parents' health care plan. it's already saved millions of seniors on medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription medicine. and millions of americans have actually gotten a rebate from their insurance company if that company -- you got one? [applause] i wanted to say -- i mean, she was a supporter. but i didn't know about -- [laughter] you get a rebate if the insurance company spent too much on demitch costs and c
of the president's national drug control policy. he brings 37 years of law enforcement and drug policy experience to the position. most recently, prior to coming to washington, he was the chief of police in seattle, washington. and prior to that, he was a deputy director for the united states department of justice office of community policing services. r. gil kerlikowske. [applause] >> good morning. thank you. i would also like pam hyde to pam, and the samhsa team. it is a real partnership and has been for well over three years. national survey on drug use and health provides the important markers but we need to measure ourselves and our work by. it tells us what is working. but it also reminds us of what we have got to do an order to keep our nation healthy. before i discuss the data being released today, i wanted to provide a bit of a perspective of this administration's approach to drug policy. and since my conformation and 2009, we have repeatedly affirmed that we are not waging a war on drugs. as a bumper sticker is totally inappropriate and it does not anywhere near reflected the approach w
beaten to death. was written cabin" very much as a protest novel to the fugitive a state law or anyone in the north, including new england, with the abolitionists and -- if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fine for breaking the law. this was seen as a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say, listen, i am a person, harriet beecher stowe, and i'm against slavery, as was much of new england, and i just my right to call a slave who finds him or herself -- t.s. my right to help the slave who finds him or herself within our borders. >> more about it. beecher stowe this weekend as -- or about. beecher stowe this weekend as we look behind the history and literary history of augusta, maine. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called "yes, but is it art?" at was accused of being a philistines, someone without the ability to appreciate con
to focus on the constitution and the rule of law because the legal framework is such that women are protected in the constitution in terms of their right. any move away from the rule of law, where trade was just as our ad hoc justices applied is bad for women. we have seen that in parts of afghanistan. the reality is that it's going to be pretty difficult for women in hearts of afghanistan because as you see in pakistan, pakistan does have the rule of law, an institution, but in the remote parts you can't always enforce it. and that is going to be the reality for a lot of women in parts of afghanistan. and i think we are pretty powerless to do much about that. but what we can try and do is try and make sure that women's rights are enshrined in the comp duchenne for interrogation from that and influence. we can use our influence because if we found the afghans come obvious they were going to make it conditional on things like corruption and human rights, on how women are treated. so we have this going to give the minister of finance to do the right thing. so i think we should use
spying. you have the law of the land in the united states. for the chinese, it is an attractive alternative. when you are on the other side of the trade and you know your competitor or the person you buy something from us under pressure financially, you should hold the card and send a card. so you just don't want to get to a point where the chinese say, look, we will do this, but we want much higher interest rates. so that is when race could spike, really impact the economy, be much costlier for average folks because rates will follow suit and will see a spiraling out of control now. so that is why you just don't want to have some other player having cars like that. in addition, you need economic growth in terms of raising revenue before this country. we are seeing growth contracts. that's okay, but it's just okay. it is not where we should meet in this kind of recovery, at this moment in the recovery based on typical recovery. next year as a result of going over the fiscal cliff and that of course is the expiration of the tax cuts to the spending programs for the most economist
don't understand where that law came from, i thought a majority is anything that's above 50%, and i don't know where this 60% came from. maybe you could enlighten us on exactly the origin of that filibuster law. host: well, andy, that would take way too long for me to explain, but perhaps we'll do that as a segment on the "washington journal" and take our viewers and listeners through the intricacies of the rules of the house and senate. but thanks for your call. we're going to move on to ron on our line for democrats, calling from florida. good morning, ron. caller: good morning. host: ron, divided party -- one party or divided government? caller: well, that question is -- the underlying point is you're saying a -- in essence, what you're saying is a one-party state, and that just doesn't work. it was proved in the soviet union and the place where i immigrated from, which was cuba. the problem is, as someone said, this is not your father's republican party. when you have a new crop signing a pledge before they even take office that allows them no room to negotiate, on top of that,
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6